Monthly Archives: August 2016

What do you know about health medical director

unduhan-10The Internet’s most popular source of medical news and information for consumers, is pleased to welcome medical director Dr. Mallika Marshall, a board-certified expert in pediatrics and internal medicine, as well as respected medical journalist.

As Everyday Health’s medical director, Dr. Marshall will appear frequently on Everyday Health, the weekly television show on ABC stations, on which she will help provide viewers with a better understanding of a broad range of health issues, from childhood bullying to epilepsy to diabetes. She will also contribute a weekly column to EverydayHealth.com called “5 Fast Facts From Dr. Mallika,” which offers key takeaways of the week’s major health headlines. Dr. Marshall also maintains a strong social media presence, in which she shares her own perspective on health news to Twitter followers and Facebook fans.

Dr. Marshall currently treats children and adults at the Massachusetts General Hospital Chelsea Urgent Care Clinic. In addition to being a practicing physician, she is also a highly regarded medical journalist. With more than a decade’s experience as a television correspondent, she has served as a regular medical contributor for The Early Show, CBS Newspath, and the CBS Evening News, and was the HealthWatch reporter for the CBS affiliate in Boston, WBZ.

She hosted “Dr. Mallika Marshall,” a nationally syndicated series of health news reports that aired in more than 70 markets including major cities such as San Francisco, Atlanta, St. Louis, Cleveland, and Houston. She is currently a contributing medical reporter for New England Cable News.

A cum laude graduate of Harvard College, Dr. Marshall received her medical degree at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine (UCSF), with honors. She completed her medical residency at Harvard University in internal medicine and pediatrics. She is a member of Alpha Omega Alpha Honors Society, the American Medical Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the National Association of Black Journalists, the Association of Health Care Journalists, and serves on the board of trustees for the Urgent Care Association of America Foundation.

In addition to numerous medical awards, she was also an associate editor of the Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide and a contributing editor for the Harvard Medical School-affiliated Web site, InteliHealth.

Married and the mother of three young children, Dr. Marshall is writing a series of children’s books that will deliver healthy messages in entertaining stories for school-age kids.

The reason when you are talking on sleep

Has your partner ever referred to a conversation that occurred the night before — and you can’t remember a thing you said? Unless it’s after a wild night out, the cause may be somniloquy, better known as sleep talking.

Sleep talking falls under the category of parasomnias, which are disruptive sleep disorders. Other parasomnias include sleepwalking, bedwetting, and night terrors. Although it can be startling, sleepwalking is generally nothing to worry about.

“Sleep talking is benign for most people,” says Russell Rosenberg, PhD, who is the chairman of the National Sleep Foundation in Atlanta. “No one knows exactly what causes it.” A lot of nighttime chitchat can cause you to feel tired the next day, but it’s generally not a cause for concern. It’s also quite common: although statistics vary, about 60 percent of us will have at least one episode of sleep talking, according to William Kohler, MD, the medical director of the Florida Sleep Institute in Tampa.

The When and How of Sleep Talking

Sleep talking tends to occur during two different stages of sleep: During stage two, when it’s just a stream of thoughts not accompanied by a dream, and during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, when it’s accompanied by active dreams. During REM sleep it’s easy to arouse a person out of sleep talking, but during stage two, it’s very hard to wake someone up, and they likely won’t remember what they were talking about. And even during REM sleep, what a sleep-talker is saying may not be related to what’s happening in their dream.

“With sleep talking, we may have active dreams — we may be speaking about what we’re dreaming. On the other hand, we could be dreaming one thing and speaking something completely different,” says Dr. Kohler.

Sleep talking can vary in frequency and intensity, and can be caused by a variety of factors, which may be as simple as drinking alcohol before going to sleep. “Having a high fever, being under emotional stress, taking certain medications, and having underlying sleep problems like sleep apnea can all cause a person to talk in their sleep,” says Kohler. Sleep talking may also run in families, he says. There aren’t any specific medications that have been singled out to cause sleep talking.

What Does All That Chitchat Mean?

Although you may be tempted to read a lot into what your partner utters in their sleep, experts don’t recommend taking too much stock in those sweet nothings. “It’s not a reflection of what’s going on in your life,” Rosenberg says. Kohler agrees: “There’s a myth that secrets can be revealed with sleep talking, but that’s not really accurate. The things people are talking about can potentially have nothing to do with reality.”

And as many parents know, sleep talking is common in kids. “This is more of a brain development issue in children,” says Rosenberg. “Most kids will grow out of it.”

If your partner or child is chattering away in their sleep, “let it play itself out — just observe and make sure they are safe,” recommends Rosenberg.

United States Drug Shortages Knowladge

Jay Cuetara arrived at the chemotherapysuite of his hospital one day and was told a critical component of the chemo cocktail that had kept his metastatic cancer in check for two-and-a-half years was unavailable.

Cuetara, 49, didn’t get treatment that day, but he still was one of the lucky ones: His San Francisco hospital managed to procure the drug and he resumed treatment in just one week. Others have been less fortunate.

Now, an executive order signed by President Barack Obama Monday may help ease the drug shortages that threaten the lives of patients like Cuetara across the United States.

The executive order directs the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to “take action” to prevent and reduce the worsening prescription drug shortages that have plagued the country for several years.

“Between 2005 and 2010, the number of prescription drug shortages has tripled,” said Kathleen Sebelius, secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, at a Monday news conference.

So far this year, some 200 drug shortages have occurred compared to 178 in all of 2010, the FDA previously stated.

The executive order directs the FDA to take steps to require drug manufacturers to report any impending shortages or discontinuances six months ahead of the shortage, as recommended by pending bipartisan legislation.

Now, drug manufacturers only have a legal obligation to notify the FDA if they are discontinuing a drug for which there is just one manufacturer, FDA commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg said, speaking at the news conference. Other notifications are voluntary.

“The data is clear that early notification has a significant and meaningful impact on drug shortage,” said Hamburg.

The FDA should also speed up its review of new manufacturing sites, new suppliers and new manufacturing protocols, and also add more staff to its drug-shortage office, the order stated.

The order also calls on the FDA to work with the U.S. Department of Justice to see if “gray market profiteers are hoarding drugs and charging exorbitant prices,” said Sebelius.

“In past months we’ve heard of blood pressure drugs which are normally sold for $26 being sold for $1,200,” she said.

Experts said the executive order is a good start, but that more is needed.

“This is a step in the right direction, but there’s still much more to be done,” said Dr. J. Leonard Lichtenfeld, deputy chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society. “We think the shortage issue is very serious. It’s a major issue and it’s disrupting patient care.”